News Item

March 6, 2014

CancerCare Manitoba joins national partnership to address priority cancer control gaps for patients from rural, remote, isolated communities

Supports strategy for high quality care, closer to home


Together with the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, CancerCare Manitoba joined a national initiative of cancer experts to improve cancer control for First Nation and Inuit Manitobans. Rates of common cancers have increased among First Nations, Inuit and Métis in the past few decades and some populations are now at or above, those in the general Canadian population.

"First Nations and Inuit Manitobans experience cultural and language differences, geographic and social remoteness, and limited access to basic services. These factors increase the difficulties patients and families face," said Kali Leary, Director of Development, First Nations, Metis and Inuit Cancer Control, CancerCare Manitoba.

In response to these challenges, the Partnership funded Improving First Nations and Inuit Cancer Care in Manitoba initiative has three main objectives:

The initiative builds on In Sixty, Manitoba's cancer patient journey initiative, funded by the province of Manitoba. Through it, CancerCare Manitoba is working with patients, families and health care workers around the province to improve care and to expedite wait times for treatment and care.

"Provincially, their experience is guiding this work, and by focusing our energies on developing the response strategies necessary to create the change required, and through joint expert efforts nationally, we can assist patients and health care providers as early as possible in the cancer journey," said Leary.

In total, the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is investing $10.2 million to implement the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control Initiative. The project is part of broader strategy stemming from the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control. Informed by First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners and the cancer control community, the plan provided a blueprint of how to best advance cancer control for and with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

"Advancing cancer control with and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities is a priority for the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer," said Lee Fairclough, VP, Strategy, Knowledge Management and Delivery at the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. "Initiatives like this one are intended to improve how we provide care in a culturally responsive and safe way. It will be very rewarding to see the impact of this work in Manitoba and across Canada."

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